September 4th, 2014
angelamelamud

Rookie: How Should a Person Be? starts by asking whether deep relationships between women are possible. Whereas Women in Clothes asserts that women definitely do have important relationships with each other. Even though Women in Clothes isn’t just your work, have your feelings about female friendship changed since 2012?

Sheila Heti: For one thing, I’ve had female friends my whole life. It was a fiction of the book that Margaux was my first female friend. But it is true that my [real-life] relationship with Margaux and publishing How Should a Person Be? changed my relationship to women in the world. Publishing that book brought me into conversation with so many female artists and writers that I wouldn’t have otherwise had the opportunity to talk to, and I continue to find so much joy in those relationships.

Collaborating with Heidi and Leanne took a lot more trust than I probably would have had before—let’s say 10 years ago, or five years ago—especially because the roles were not clear. I was also really enjoying the conversations I was having online with all these different women for Women in Clothes. Seeing these conversations happening on the internet seemed like a moment where women were getting a lot out of talking to each other—about everything, not just feminism and things that we would associate with feminism, but every aspect of life. And to sort of capture that moment and capture that excitement in a book, it made a lot of sense to me.

Women in Clothes, a book collaboration between Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits and Leanne Shapton about women’s relationship to style, is on sale from Penguin (Blue Rider Press) today! Read the rest of Rookie's interview with Heti here. And find out more about How Should a Person Be? here.

September 2nd, 2014
angelamelamud
The Paris Review's Fall 2014 issue has arrived! In the Art of Fiction No. 225, Herta Müller discusses her early fascination with plants (“They knew how to live and I didn’t”), life under Ceauşescu, and her approach to the sentence:

I’m not hungry for words, but they have a hunger of their own. They want to consume what I have experienced, and I have to make sure that they do that … The language knows where it has to wind up. I know what I want, but the sentence knows how I’ll get there.

[via]

The Paris Review's Fall 2014 issue has arrived! In the Art of Fiction No. 225, Herta Müller discusses her early fascination with plants (“They knew how to live and I didn’t”), life under Ceauşescu, and her approach to the sentence:

I’m not hungry for words, but they have a hunger of their own. They want to consume what I have experienced, and I have to make sure that they do that … The language knows where it has to wind up. I know what I want, but the sentence knows how I’ll get there.

[via]

August 27th, 2014
picadorbooks

nprbooks:

Lots of books coming out in paperback this week! In fiction…

In nonfiction …

Hello, Affairs of Others!

Reblogged from NPR Books
August 25th, 2014
angelamelamud

Back-to-school season is upon us! Here are a few books to get you through the year. (Or at least the first semester.)

For those of us battling a roommate’s dirty dishes and passive-aggressive Post-it’s: The Roommates by Stephanie Wu

To learn the difference between getting older and growing up: Friendship by Emily Gould

To “inspire laughter, chills of recognition, and flights into lesbianism” (Lena Dunham): The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. by Adelle Waldman

Because you’ll never stop believing in the magic of bookstores:
Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

When you find yourself in need of a maintenance manual for the mind: How to Stay Sane by Philippa Perry

And for those dilemmas of modern sexuality: How to Think More About Sex by Alain de Botton

August 20th, 2014
angelamelamud

"If you are out drinking with friends or colleagues, it’s not considered sporting to go home until everyone does. Nausea is in no way a good reason to go home. If you must vomit, go off and do it in the bathroom or alleyway, then return and repeat the self-poisoning/purge process. It is totally within bounds to ask a friend to help you barf."

In case you were wondering what modern Korean etiquette entails, Euny Hong, author of The Birth of Korean Cool, just wrote a guide.

(via: Kindle Daily Post)

August 20th, 2014
picadorbooks

Take a moment to fall in love with Henry Sene Yee's cover design for the new Picador Modern Classics Charming Billy edition, on sale this October.

August 18th, 2014
angelamelamud

Reason #7930 Lena Dunham’s awesome: She has an ARC of Katha Pollitt’s Pro on her bookshelf!

August 18th, 2014
picadorbooks

Sally O’Reilly’s Dark Aemilia Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours start today!

For more information, click here.

August 18th, 2014
picadorbooks
August 11th, 2014
angelamelamud
Sinclair Lewis said most writers don’t understand that the process begins by actually sitting down.
Tom WolfeThe Paris Review Art of Fiction, Spring 1991
August 11th, 2014
picadorbooks

nprbooks:

In fiction…

  • Amy Grace Loyd’s The Affairs Of Others  follows a young widow and landlord whose preference for solitude is challenged when one of her tenants goes missing and an unexpected subletter moves in. 

And in nonfiction…

Click here for a chance to win a paperback copy of Amy Grace Loyd’s The Affairs of Others!

Reblogged from NPR Books
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