December 28th, 2012
ggantz

The Russians and the French essentially set the terms of the modernist novel as it flourished in Britain and America between 1920 and 1945. You can trace the excitement of encounter in Virginia Woolf’s essays, especially those written in the teens and the twenties of the century, as she discovered the new translations of the Russians into English by Constance Garnett. 

From How Fiction Works, by James Wood. Picador, page 164.

[Images: Virginia Woolf; Tolstoy and Chekhov]

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    The Russians and the French essentially set the terms of the modernist novel as it flourished in Britain and America...
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