March 28th, 2013
ggantz
Continuing our series where were speak with bloggers, Maris Kreizman, the brains behind the wildly popular Tumblr Slaughterhouse 90210, answered a few questions about how she comes up with all those great posts, where she reads, and how she finds her next book.
Slaughterhouse 90210 is a celebration of books and TV and the ways they intersect, blending high and low culture (and the many gray areas in between) to create something entirely new.
PICADOR: How did the idea of mashing up literary quotes with television and film stills come to you? 
MK: My friend suggested I start a Tumblr with literary quotes and I had a bunch, so I was game. But it seemed so boring. And then I realized that a quote would be so much more interesting with a photo of Don Draper on top of it. That’s how it began.
How has Slaughterhouse 90210 changed the way you read books and watch television and movies?  
Good question. I’m always looking for a quote, a screenshot, a moment that I want to capture. It means that there are certain types of writers to whom I gravitate—I just read SPEEDBOAT and Renata Adler really works for my purposes. She makes broad, brilliant, overarching statements about the ways people behave. So does Jeanette Winterson. And Murakami. (Of course, I love prose that’s very specific too. It just doesn’t fit as seamlessly into the blog.)  
You joined Tumblr early. What made you choose this platform over others? 
I’d never had a blog before.Tumblr was so intuitive. And I didn’t know it then, but I know it now: Tumblr gave me the tools that Slaughterhouse 90210 needed to grow. That I could post something that people could easily reblog and share and talk about—that’s special. I feel a sense of community with the book people on Tumblr that I don’t think I would’ve found elsewhere.
How do you keep track of and organize your quotes and photos?
I have an enormous Google doc where I compile quotes. I have a few hundreds I haven’t used yet, so I’m constantly scrolling through, looking for the perfect one to go along with whatever TV show I happen to be watching. “Ctrl F” helps. 
Where is your favorite place to read? 
On a bench on the Promenade in Brooklyn Heights. When the weather is decent, I can sit out there for hours, reading and thinking and looking across the East River at Manhattan and watching all the neighborhood dogs go by. 
“Discoverability” is the word of the hour in the literary world. How do you decide what to read next? 
It’s a mix. Recommendations from friends are obviously the best. That I happen to have friends who work at publishing houses who are passionate about books for their jobs? Even better. And then I’ll certainly take note if a book gets a rave from a critic I trust. Or if there’s a compelling staff pick at a particular bookstore I love. I use Goodreads avidly to keep track of the books I want to read and the books my friends want to read. 
If you could bring one author back to life to write a contemporary novel who would it be? 
I would like for Truman Capote to write a fictionalized version of the life and times of Buzz Bissinger.
What TV show are you into right now?
If I told you that at its best moments Pretty Little Liars can be downright Lynchian, would you believe me? You should!
Maris Kreizman is the creator of Slaughterhouse 90210. You can find her on Twitter and Goodreads, and you can check out her Pinterest devoted to Adam Scott’s ties.

Continuing our series where were speak with bloggers, Maris Kreizman, the brains behind the wildly popular Tumblr Slaughterhouse 90210, answered a few questions about how she comes up with all those great posts, where she reads, and how she finds her next book.

Slaughterhouse 90210 is a celebration of books and TV and the ways they intersect, blending high and low culture (and the many gray areas in between) to create something entirely new.

PICADOR: How did the idea of mashing up literary quotes with television and film stills come to you?

MK: My friend suggested I start a Tumblr with literary quotes and I had a bunch, so I was game. But it seemed so boring. And then I realized that a quote would be so much more interesting with a photo of Don Draper on top of it. That’s how it began.

How has Slaughterhouse 90210 changed the way you read books and watch television and movies?  

Good question. I’m always looking for a quote, a screenshot, a moment that I want to capture. It means that there are certain types of writers to whom I gravitate—I just read SPEEDBOAT and Renata Adler really works for my purposes. She makes broad, brilliant, overarching statements about the ways people behave. So does Jeanette Winterson. And Murakami. (Of course, I love prose that’s very specific too. It just doesn’t fit as seamlessly into the blog.)  

You joined Tumblr early. What made you choose this platform over others?

I’d never had a blog before.Tumblr was so intuitive. And I didn’t know it then, but I know it now: Tumblr gave me the tools that Slaughterhouse 90210 needed to grow. That I could post something that people could easily reblog and share and talk about—that’s special. I feel a sense of community with the book people on Tumblr that I don’t think I would’ve found elsewhere.

How do you keep track of and organize your quotes and photos?

I have an enormous Google doc where I compile quotes. I have a few hundreds I haven’t used yet, so I’m constantly scrolling through, looking for the perfect one to go along with whatever TV show I happen to be watching. “Ctrl F” helps. 

Where is your favorite place to read?

On a bench on the Promenade in Brooklyn Heights. When the weather is decent, I can sit out there for hours, reading and thinking and looking across the East River at Manhattan and watching all the neighborhood dogs go by. 

“Discoverability” is the word of the hour in the literary world. How do you decide what to read next?

It’s a mix. Recommendations from friends are obviously the best. That I happen to have friends who work at publishing houses who are passionate about books for their jobs? Even better. And then I’ll certainly take note if a book gets a rave from a critic I trust. Or if there’s a compelling staff pick at a particular bookstore I love. I use Goodreads avidly to keep track of the books I want to read and the books my friends want to read. 

If you could bring one author back to life to write a contemporary novel who would it be?

I would like for Truman Capote to write a fictionalized version of the life and times of Buzz Bissinger.

What TV show are you into right now?

If I told you that at its best moments Pretty Little Liars can be downright Lynchian, would you believe me? You should!

Maris Kreizman is the creator of Slaughterhouse 90210. You can find her on Twitter and Goodreads, and you can check out her Pinterest devoted to Adam Scott’s ties.

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    It’s pretty intresting… At one point she ask about wicht autor would she bring back to life again, to write a novel in...
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